In each article in the series ‘Taking a Closer Look,’ I propose that we acknowledge various things.

In this article let’s take a closer look at why it is of utmost importance to acknowledge these things.

Firstly and foremost, when we acknowledge something, we state our intent. It is an indication that we came to a conclusion.

For instance, let’s say we want to do something, it doesn’t matter what – and of course the converse is also true, that there is something we’d rather not do – the very first step is to conclude that we want to do or not do something.

While still uncertain or maybe denying that we want to do or not do something, or, we don’t decide because we feel we can’t decide or possibly don’t know how, then intent is not yet present.

While we’re not convinced, we probably need to acknowledge this. Thus to acknowledge implies we’re at the stage of being convinced; say for e.g. that our current job does not suit us.

A footnote on the aforementioned: Even if we acknowledge that we don’t know what we want, this is actually a valid acknowledgement.

So to acknowledge that we’re undecided is also a valid acknowledgement.

Thus to acknowledge brings with it intent: Intent that immediately starts the ball rolling, even if only a small bit at a time.

Once we have intent, we have the required energy to take the first step towards doing or not doing ‘the something‘.

Each step in that direction is a step closer, with acknowledging being the first. The rest then follows.

To acknowledge is a powerful mechanism. Without it very little happens. Oh plenty happens, usually incidentally. We can easily observe this.

For example: Say we have a job that does not interest us anymore… Or we smoke and we know we don’t like it… Say we want to buy a new car because our current car is unreliable…

We’ll not make a move towards taking those steps until we acknowledge to ourselves, the time has come to stop smoking, get a suitable job or replace our unreliable car.

As we acknowledge; the intent kicks in and we somehow find a way to do what is required; we thus take action. If for instance, we smoke and we acknowledge that we don’t really like it, we’ll have the courage and stop. Before we acknowledge that we in fact don’t like smoking, we stand very little chance to stop smoking. It requires the acknowledgement, which in turn opens us up for the intent, and the next steps to stopping smoking.

There are other instances where all that is required is to acknowledge. Say we get frustrated or irritable in traffic, and in fact we acknowledge that how we feel in the traffic isn’t really how we want to feel, and say instead we’d rather want to experience peace and calm while negotiating traffic – even when some driver cuts in-front of us – all that is required as the first step is to acknowledge that we don’t like the frustration and irritation. To start the shift from that behaviour nothing more is required.

Take note of what we want to alter, the doing or not doing of something, acknowledge that, thereby we are taking the required first step towards setting ourselves free!

Free to shift from where we are to where we want to be!